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BERKOWITZ ENVELOPE CO., K. O., MO. 



FAMOUS PAINTINGS 

Compiled by 
FRANCIS H. ROBERTSON 



CHILDREN 



ALREADY PUBLISHED 

LANDSCAPES 
MADONNAS 
PASTORALS 

INTERIORS 

IN PREPARATION 

PORTRAITS 

GENRE PAINTINGS 

SYMBOLIC PAINTINGS 

HISTORICAL PAINTINGS 

ETC., ETC. 




Don Carlos on Horseback Velasquez 



FAMOUS PAINTINGS 

Children 



INTERPRETATIONS 

By HENRY TURNER BAILEY 

TEN PLATES IN COLOR 

FROM THE ORIGINAL MASTERPIECES 



COMPILED BY 
FRANCIS H. ROBERTSON 




NEW YORK 

THE ART EXTENSION SOCIETY, INC. 

1931 



Copyright, 1931 by 

ART EXTENSION SOCIETY, INC. 
NEW YORK. 




Children of Chas. I Van Dyck 



PREFACE 

Children are the "consummation most 
devoutly to be wished", the wonderment, 
the delight, the harassing problem, the in- 
spiration and solace o parents and teachers, 
and the hope of the world. 

The art of the ancients had but little to 
do with them. Animals and slaves, soldiers 
and kings and gods were more important. 
Sympathetic and appreciative Interest in 
children was initiated by Him who said 
"Suffer the little children to come unto me 
and forbid them not; for of such Is the 
Kingdom of heaven;" but not until the 
Renaissance did artists begin to look at 
children with "a clear and loving eye that 
seeth as God seeth;" and only within the 
memory of people now living have children 
commanded the attention they deserve* Re- 
cent conferences on the problems of child- 
hood and youth are significant of the mod- 
ern attitude towards the most important of 
those "National resources" which merit 
conservation. 



The pictures of children here gathered to- 
gether have all been painted within the last 
three centuries, Spanish, Dutch 5 English,, 
and American, they all show the same in- 
sight into child character in its many moods, 
active and passive thoughtful, playful, 
joyous, nonchalant, imitative, dreamy. Fre- 
quently the animals children love are as- 
sociated with them. Always the children 
are represented as enjoying themselves in a 
friendly and beautiful world, the world to 
which children seem to have an inalienable 
right. 

These pictures, among the most famous 
ever painted, will give delight to every lover 
of children. If in addition they promote 
closer observation, more sympathetic atten- 
tion, and greater determination to give all 
children all that they should have that they 
may become better citizens of the world 
than we are ourselves, their publication in 
this form will not have been in vain. 



CONTENTS 

PLATE PAGE 

I DON CARLOS ON HORSEBACK 

Frontispiece VELASQUEZ 9 

II THE PASTRY EATERS MURILLO 15 

III CHILDREN OF CHARLES I VANDYCK 21 

IV THE AGE OF INNOCENCE REYNOLDS 25 
V Miss BOWLES REYNOLDS 31 

VI THE BLUE BOY GAINSBOROUGH 35 

VII THE CALM ADY CHILDREN LAWRENCE 41 

VIII BOY WITH RABBIT RAEBURN 47 

IX THE TORN HAT SULLY 53 

X WHISTLING BOY DUVENECK 59 



PLATE I. 

CARJLOS oisr 

Frontispiece 

3ODEGO RODBJOtJEZ 3DE 

Spanisli School 



painted, tliis spirited figure of 
the yoiith.fu.1 prince as a liorseman, In 
1^3^. Tlie canvas now liangs In th.e 3?rado 
Gallery, 



Tlie size of tne IPIcfLire is 82 3: "7 incKes. 




DON CARLOS ON 
HORSEBACK 

$y VELASQUEZ 

little Spanish Prince is out 
alone. That o itself is enough 
to make a Prince happy. He is 
riding his own pet pony, the 
plumpest little pony in all the world. He is 
dressed as his father the King dresses when 
he rides in silk and velvet and lace, with 
riding boots, and gloves, and saddle cloth, 
all gold embroidered. The pony's harness is 
richly decorated. The Prince carries a baton 
and an ornamental sword. Behind the pony 
and his little master appears the picturesque 
landscape of Spain with its rough open 
spaces, its olive orchards, its green valleys 



DON CARLOS ON HORSEBACK 

and its desolate snow-capped mountains. 
The pony is a kindly little beast, with lux- 
uriant mane and tail. He has the same ex- 
pression as his rider, a sort of solemn and 
selfconscious pride. 

The composition is extraordinarily simple 
and effective. All the elements radiate in 
fluttering lines from the upper end of the 
boy's baton, downward and to the right, 
giving the impression of movement without 
effort. The white cloud and the dark brown 
hat, and the strong light upon the child's 
pale face, serve as irresistible attractions for 
the eye, and make even the brilliant elegance 
of the costume of secondary importance. 
The color scheme includes two analogous 
scales, complementary to each other, orange 
central in one and green-blue in the other. 
The cool colors predominate. The technique 



10 



VELASQUEZ 

Is Velasquez's own free, direct, assured, 
never a false note in value, never a super- 
fluous brush stroke, and all with a certain 
high seriousness combined with delight in 
the doing, 

Don Carlos was the son of Philip II. He 
was recognized as heir to the throne, sent 
to a university where he made a bad record, 
excluded from all participation in the gov- 
ernment, was openly opposed to the power- 
ful Duke of Alva and his policies in Hol- 
land, thought of assassinating the King, was 
arrested, condemned to death, and shortly 
afterwards was found dead in his bed, at 
the age of twenty-three. In view of all this, 
the little Prince on his pony is a rather pa- 
thetic figure. He seems foredoomed to 
trouble, and to live under the shadow of it. 
No wonder he does not smile. It is fortun- 



ll 



DON CARLOS ON HORSEBACK 

ate that Velasquez immortalized him at this 
particular moment. He never looked bet- 
ter. He has given more people greater 
pleasure through this picture than he ever 
gave to his subjects during his brief lifetime. 



12 



PLATE II. THE PASTRY EATERS 

BARTOLOMEO ESTEBAIST MURXLJLO 

Spanish School 1616-1682 



This picture "was acquired from the 
Mannheim Gallery, and now hangs in the 

Munich Gallery. 

The size o the Canvas is 48 x 40 inches. 




The Pastry Eaters Murillo 



*By MURILLO 




URILLO, one of the most facile 
and popular of Spanish painters, 
was employed almost constantly 
in painting religious pictures 
Madonnas and Saints. But the artist loved 
children and liked to paint them. In his 
Children of the Shell and in his Vision of 
St. Anthony, he was able to combine what 
he had to do with what he loved to do, and 
produced religious pictures in which charm- 
ing children were of chief interest. In 
studying his work one is driven to the con- 
clusion that he saw something admirable in 
children, though they were not saintly. He 
has left us pictures of beggar boys, of boys 



is 



THE PASTRY EATERS 

throwing dice, of care-free boys and girls 
off the street. Among his famous paintings 
there are no less than a dozen In which peas- 
ant children appear. Murillo discovered 
something that Emerson, long afterward, 
put Into words: 

"Oft In unexpected places 
I detect far-wandered graces, 
Which from Eden wide astray, 
In lowly homes have lost their way." 

This picture shows two barefoot boys, 
with torn and patched clothing, resting by 
the wayside, and enjoying a bit of pastry. 
A yellow dog is with them. Intensely Inter- 
ested and confidently hopeful that he may 
have his share of the spoils. Perhaps it Is best 
to assume that these boys were sent to mar- 
ket to buy supplies for some trustful neigh- 
bor, and that they are returning with bread 



16 



MURILLO 



and fruit and vegetables. We might hope 
that the neighbor gave them a few cents to 
spend as they pleased, or that some kindly 
market woman of whom they purchased the 
ordered goods, gave them a little tart. 

The composition follows the old pyram- 
idal tradition. The line from the boy's 
heel at the left, to the dog's tail at the right 
is the base, and the upraised hand the apex, 
which becomes the center of interest. The 
eye is led to this center by the leading lines 
of the picture the handle of the basket, 
the forearm of one boy and the shoulder of 
the other, and the action of all three figures. 

The boys are represented as being out of 
doors, but the light-ancf-shade is that of the 
studio. The color scheme is analogous, 
orange-yellow central and dominant. The 
boys 5 clothing is nondescript and ragged, but 



17 



THE PASTRY EATERS 

rich with subdued colors. The still-life in 
the foreground is admirably handled. The 
background is dim and merely suggestive in 
treatment. But the head of the dog and 
the faces of the boys leave nothing to be 
desired. They are alive, alert, charged with 
emotion. 

The picture carries a happy-go-lucky 
mood which makes it popular. Perhaps it 
reflects a mood of the great master himself, 
glad to escape, occasionally, from the com- 
pany of Madonnas, saints, and angels, and 
to take pot-luck with common folk, where 
even boys are welcome. 



18 



PLATE III. 
CHILDREN OF CHARLES I. 

A^STToisr VAUST DYCK. 
Flemish School 1599-1641 

Tills painting Hangs in the Turin Gallery. 
The size o the Picture is 59 x. 60 inches. 




OF 1 

*By VAN DYCK 

ERE are Charles, Prince of Wales, 
aged 5, with his pet dog; Prin- 
cess Mary, aged 4, who became 
the wife of William II, Prince of 
Orange; and James, aged 2 3 "Baby Stuart," 
who succeeded his brother, Charles II, on 
the throne, as James II. They are all in 
royal attire, in a temporary shelter in the 
palace garden. The baby has been placed 
on a platform, to raise him to the level de- 
sired by the artist. He wears his familiar 
lace cap and holds his ageless apple. Mary 
is conscious already that she is a Princess 
and should look the part. From the face of 
Charles, the seer could foretell his good- 
natured, clever, deceitful, and sensuous life. 



21 



CHILDREN OF CHARLES I 

As a work of art the picture., now In the 
Turin Gallery, Is a masterpiece. The three 
figures are admirably spaced and colored to 
give the next King of England first place, 
without destroying the unity of the group 
In which the dog and the bunch of roses 
are essential. Textures are rendered per- 
fectly, and the light-and-shade gives a 
luminosity of effect, achieved only by the 
greatest Dutch Masters. 

The picture carries the mood in which 
Van Dyck always painted, the mood created 
by aristocracy and wealth at their best, "All 
his subjects have prepared themselves for 
posing before posterity," said a Frenchman. 
"All are anxious to give their descendants a 
lofty Idea of their condition and manners." 
That seems to be true even with these 
children, whose portraits "may be classed 
among the most finished works of art/' 



22 



PLATE IV. AGE OF INNOCENCE 

SIR JOSHUA REYISTOLDS 
English School 1723-1792 

Painted In 1788 this canvas was acquired 
by the National Gallery through the 
Vernon gift in 1847. 

The size of the Picture is 30 x 25 inches. 




of Innocence Reynolds 




THE AGE OF 

'By REYNOLDS 

N THE list of Sir Joshua's famous 
paintings this picture is entered 
under the year 1788 ? as a "fancy 
subject," like the Fortune Teller, 
The Strawberry Girl, and the Infant Samuel. 
Like many another artist. Sir Joshua, him- 
self childless, was fond of children. He 
loved to paint them, and never failed to 
endear himself to them. An editor of Rey- 
nold's Discourses said that "in his day in all 
the world there were no children so charm- 
ing as English children, with their unspoiled 
naturalness and dainty freshness and purity 
of color." Years afterward Ruskin ex- 
pressed the same belief. This little lady, 



THE AGE OF INNOCENCE 

whoever she may have been 3 helps to justify 
the statement. 

The Italian masters and Rubens had per- 
fected the cherub. It remained for Sir 
Joshua Reynolds to paint real children at 
their most charming moments. He liked 
to represent them as out-of-doors, the en- 
vironment children love most. This little 
girl, comfortably seated 3 unconscious of the 
observer, is a mass of loveliness, from her 
chubby toes to the top of her wayward hair. 
What a refined profile ! How well the ear is 
half hidden! And what an effective touch 
Is that curling lock with Its fascinating 
shadow! 

Not only Is the head with Its deep-set 
lustrous eye. Its delicately modeled nose, and 
its dimpled mouth, painted with exquisite 
care to give it first place In the composl- 



26 



REYNOLDS 

tion, but It Is placed within a charming 
circle composed of the hands, the shoulder 
of the dress, the glints of light upon the 
tree trunk, the foliage above, and the cloud 
forms, returning the eye to the dimpled 
hands. Behind the face the misty blue of 
the sky gives a background In perfect com- 
plementary contrast with the flesh tones. 

The actual colors of nature are sacrificed 
to the mellow mysterious gloom of that 
world which Innocent children inhabit, a 
world where gnomes and elves and fairies 
might be seen at any moment. This effect 
was secured by an under-painting In little 
more than black and white, glazed with 
transparent varnishes charged with the tints 
required to complete the color. This gives 
what Haydon called Sir Joshua's "glorious 
gemmy surface/' 



27 



THE AGE OF INNOCENCE 

But the little girl herself Is of supreme 
importance. Something has attracted her 
attention. She is thrilled with what she sees. 
She is uncertain as to what It means. What 
Beauty of sweet-and-twenty, first conscious 
of the meaning of Love, could express the 
new throb of her heart more perfectly than 
does this little maid to whom such an ex- 
perience Is at this moment beyond the range 
of possibility? It Is a perfect picture of 
what Sidney Lanier called "Wise Child- 
hood's deep implying.' 5 



28 



PLATE V. MISS BOWLES 

SIR JosttijA. REYNOLDS 
English School 1723-17^2 

This subject was painted In 1775. Orig- 
inally in the collection of the IvEarqiais 
of IHEertforci;, it rto-vv^ hangs in the " 
Collection In 



Size of the Canvas is 35 *^> x 27%. inches. 




Miss Bowles Reynolds 




Sy REYNOLDS 

IR Joshua Reynolds painted about 
three thousand pictures 5 mostly 
portraits, many of them portraits 
of children,, One of these is the 
portrait of Miss Bowles, This picture hangs 
in Hertford House, London,, with one other 
picture of his, haunted with the mystery of 
childhood, the Strawberry Girl 5 and with 
his pretty Nellie O'Brien, to keep it com- 
pany. 

This happy little lady sits in a cozy nook 
in a dim forest, listening to fairy music. 
(There seems to be a little trumpet at the 
foot of the old tree at the right!) The sun- 
light streams through chinks in the forest- 



31 



MISS BOWLES 

wall of leaves; but the light on the little girl 
comes directly from the open sky. She clasps 
affectionately her solemn little dog, who ap- 
pears to be fairly content for the moment. 

It is pleasant to think that Sir Joshua saw 
in this lovely child a hint of the Eternal 
Womanly, that adorable mother spirit that 
makes any place in the world seem home- 
like, that clasps to its heart whoever needs 
loving, that radiates happiness and peace but 
never loses that sense of something mystical, 
spiritual, beautiful, just beyond the realm 
of mortal ear and eye but very real to the 
pure in heart. 

Consciously or unconsciously, Sir Joshua 
has put into this dear little Miss Bowles an 
understanding of things unseen. Looking 
at her one can understand more easily the 
Master's words "Of such is the kingdom of 
heaven." 



32 



PLATE VI. THE BLUE BOY 

TM03VCAS GAT3STSI30IXOTLJGI-I 

English School 1727-1788 

Long in the .Art Gallery at Grosvcnor 
p-Ioiise, London, it; \vas brouglit to the 
United. States in 1922 and nov^ hangs in 
the HDuintington Collection in San Gabriel, 
California. 

Size of the Picture is 7O x 48^ inches. 




The Blue Boy Gainsborough 




THE 

3; GAINSBOROUGH 

jjjHIS Is the most famous cool pic- 
ture In the world. Its dominant 
colors are blue, green, and violet- 
gray. The warm colors are in 
small areas, in the hand and face; and, 
much dulled, In the hat and the foreground. 
In Sir Joshua Reynolds' eighth Discourse 
he said "The masses of light In a picture 
ought to be always warm, mellow color, 
yellow, red, or a yellowish-white; and the 
blue, the gray, or the green colors should be 
kept almost entirely out of these masses, and 
be used only to support and set off these 
warm colors. . . . Let this conduct be re- 
versed, . . . and it will be out of the power 



35 



THE BLUE BOY 

of art., even in the hands of Rubens or 
Titian, to make a picture splendid and har- 
monious." 

It used to be said that Gainsborough 
painted this picture to refute Sir Joshua's 
statement; but It may be that Sir Joshua 
formulated that statement after having seen 
this canvas. 

The Blue Boy Is a portrait of Jonathan 
Buttall, son of a wealthy Iron merchant of 
London. He Is a well-proportioned boy, 
slim, graceful, self-possessed, a joy to his 
parents, who have dressed him in blue satin, 
with a beaver cap and an ostrich plume for 
contrast. He stands well. He has an Intelli- 
gent face of almost feminine beauty. The 
composition makes him appear as unusually 
tall for his age. 

The technique of the Blue Boy Is some- 



GAINSBOROUGH 

what sketchy In the accessories; but free ? 
and quite adequate throughout, with just 
the right amount of accent in the face to 
make it the center of Interest. 

The picture Is an excellent example of 
the artist's method. "He painted with ar- 
rowy speed. . . He used at times brushes 
upon sticks six feet long. . . . His skies are 
constantly cloudy, with an effect generally 
of coming rain. The country represented 
is rough and broken. . . . The prevailing 
feeling of his landscapes Is somewhat sad." 
This picture is typical for another reason: 
**He always made his sitters look pleasant 
and after a while, distinguished. Unity ofi 
impression is one of the most marked quali-y 
ties of his work. Every touch (and very 
willful some of his touches look) tends to- 
wards the foreseen result." 



37 



THE BLUE BOY 

As one writer, Conway, says: "The Blue 
Boy is of all Gainsborough's pictures that 
in which genius, labor, and developed skill, 
meet in most balanced harmony." 

The picture, formerly In the collection of 
the Duke of Westminster, is now one of 
the most highly valued canvases In the 
Huntington Collection, San Gabriel, Cali- 
fornia. 

It was bought at an unbelievably high 
price. Its transfer to the United States 
shocked and saddened all Europe, 



38 



PLATE VII. 
THE CALMADY CHILDREN 

SIR TMOMAS LAWIRE^CE 
English School I769-I83O 

This portrait, painted In 1824, was be- 
queathed to the Metropolitan. Museum of 
Art by JVfr. Collis P. Huntington in 1925. 

Size of the Canvas Is 3 */s ^ 3 5^3 inches. 




The Calrnady Children Lawrence 




THE 

<By LAWRENCE 

MILY and Laura, children of the 
Calmadys of Lengdon Court, 
Devon, so fascinated Sir Thomas 
Lawrence that he begged the 
privilege of painting their portraits. When 
they came to his studio he often persuaded 
them to stay for lunch, and after lunch he 
would play with them, read to them, sketch 
for them, keenly observing them all the 
while, so that when they continued to sit for 
him in the afternoon, happy without shy- 
ness, he could the better catch on his canvas 
something of their loveliness and charm. 

He called the picture "Nature," and con- 
sidered it his best picture. "I have no hesi- 



41 



THE CALMADY CHILDREN 

tation in saying so/' he affirmed. "My best 
picture of the kind, quite one of the few 
I should wish hereafter to be known by/ 5 

When George IV saw the picture, he 
wished to possess it, but the Calmadys were 
unwilling to part with it. The picture was 
painted in 1823 and remained in the pos- 
session of the family until 1886. It now 
forms a part of the Huntington Collection 
in the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New 
York City. 

The composition is unusual, being in a 
circle like Raphael's Madonna of the Chair, 
and Brush's Mother and Child. The children 
appear to be without self-consciousness, in 
attitudes assumed naturally, one front view 
and one in profile. With one exception 
hands and feet do not appear; only rounded 
knees and elbows, and one perfect shoulder. 



42 



LAWRENCE 

The drapery Is very graceful, flaming up 
between the knees of the younger child and 
flickering away between the heads, and 
across the breast o the older child. The 
flesh looks clean and firm. The hair Is lus- 
trous. The curls are natural. The raised 
hand is a daring Innovation which would 
distract the attention were it not for the 
fascinating faces of the children, one so 
friendly and the other so adoring. Their 
intimacy is emphasized by the ''figure eight" 
arrangement of the two heads, and by the 
dominance of Inter-related curved lines 
throughout the composition. 

The light Is concentrated on the fore- 
heads, especially on that of the darker- 
haired sister, where its glow is heightened by 
contrast. How well the ears are subordi- 



43 



THE CALMADY CHILDREN 

nated! In fact everything is subordinated 
to the spirit of the younger child. 

The color scheme is a rich analogous har- 
mony with just a touch of its complemen- 
tary in the one ribbon 3 and with its far 
away echo in the cool background. 

The faces are indeed animated and joyful. 
The younger child seems to be looking at 
the artist, smiling, and raising her hand like 
a little pupil in school, to attract his atten- 
tion. The older sister is sisterly love in- 
carnate. 



44 



PLATE VIII. BOY WITH RABBIT 

SIR HENRY RAEBtjRisr 
British School (Scottish) 1756-1823 

This canvas hangs in Burlington House, 

London. 

The size of the Picture is 40 x 31 inches. 




Boy with Rabbit Raeburn 




"By RAEBURN 

iHIS Is what the art critics of our 
time are pleased to call, con- 
temp tuously, "a pretty picture/' 
It is just that. Here is a young 
English boy, as handsome as an English boy 
can. be and there are few handsomer in the 
world, so Ruskin said sitting on one foot, 
with one hand holding some parsnip leaves 
and with one arm crooked about a pretty 
white rabbit. The boy has brown hair, 
beneath a close-fitting cap of dark green. 
The boy's eyes are brown. He wears a white 
blouse with a ruffled collar 3 open at the 
throat. His long-legged trowsers are dull 
yellow. Behind his head is a suggestion of 
the foliage of a tree. 

47 



BOY "WITH RABBIT 

The subject is really of little consequence. 
The way the subject is presented is all im- 
portant that constitutes the fine art of it. 

It is composed in march time One* two ; 
one, two; large, small; heavy, light; boy, rab- 
bit; boy's beady rabbit's head; arm, leg; and 
(at right angles) mass of other arm and rab- 
bit, and mass of other leg. This rhythm of 
measure extends to every detail: big dark 
mass in lower part of the picture, smaller 
dark mass above; large warm area of back- 
ground at the left, smaller area at the right; 
two glints of light in the cap, one stronger 
than the other; two shining things in the 
foreground, one brighter than the other; 
light on the foot, lesser light on the hand 
near it; dark spot between the rabbit's head 
and the ruffle, smaller dark spot betwen the 
rabbit and the thumb, flesh area of face in 
strong light, flesh area of breast not so lum- 



48 



RAEBURN 

inous; dark eye of rabbit, and another not so 
bright; one side of the ruffled collar light, 
the other not so light; ears, fingers, masses 
of hair, and leaves, all In rhythmic pairs. It 
would be difficult to find a more consistent 
composition so far as rhythm is concerned. 

Now look at the rhythmic shapes. The 
forms are all variations of the egg shape or 
oval, sometimes pointed: face, breast area; 
arm, leg; rabbit's ears; boy's hands; another 
rhythmic sequence. 

Now think of the emphasis of lights: the 
face of boy is of first importance, therefore 
most luminous; the rabbit is next in im- 
portance, therefore a little less luminous. 
From these the scale runs down through 
blouse, breast, knee, background at right, 
at left, right leg, rock, foreground, foliage, 
shadow at right, gloom at left another per- 
fect sequence. 



BOY WITH RABBIT 

The fourth rhythmic sequence is in hues 
of color: white of the blouse, yellow white 
of the rabbit, yellow of the trousers, orange 
of the flesh, red-orange of the light in back- 
ground, orange-red of the cheeks, red of the 
lips. This group of warm analogous colors 
is enriched by a few bits of the cool com- 
plementary colors, green and blue-green, so 
that the warm, cool, conforms to the large., 
small of the original rhythm. 

C< A pretty picture/ 5 Indeed it is* As pretty 
as Tennyson's lullaby: "Sweet and low, 
sweet and low; wind of the western sea," 
which is written in the same slow time. 
That song is pure poetry in the realm of 
language. This picture is pure poetry in 
the realm of delineation. Loveliness is a 
quality of art that normal human beings 
will always cherish and enjoy. 



50 



PLAXE IX. THE TORN MAX 

TI-IO:M:A.S SULLY 
American School 1783-1872 

This canvas "was Tbeq-ueathed. t:o tHe iBoston 
jMCuiseiim o Fine Arts in. menaory of Ad!rs. 
John Singleton Copley, a patron of the 
arts. 

Siz;e of the Picture is 1 9 **/& x 14^2 inches. 




The Torn Hat Sully 




HAT 

<By THOMAS SULLY 

)R more than one hundred years 
this picture has been popular, 
for upon the boy's blue hat-band 
may be found, painted in red, 
"T. S. 1820." It is refreshing to find a can- 
vas like this from the hand of the man who 
painted President Jefferson for West Point,, 
and Commander Decatur for the City of 
New York, and who was sent to England 
to paint a portrait of Queen Victoria for the 
St. George Society of Philadelphia. Sully 
painted more than twenty-five hundred 
portraits, but none more popular than this, 
of a healthy little chap, "just back from 
play," who looks everybody straight in the 
eye without embarrassment or fear. 



THE TORN HAT 

Sully loved children. He had a large 
family of Ms own. This may account for 
the illustrations he made for Robinson 
Crusoe. But this picture is enough to prove 
that he had "a clear and loving eye" that 
saw beauty unadorned, and that he was one 
of the best of portrait painters of his day. 

To paint flesh, or anything else, as it ap- 
pears in both sunshine and shadow, in such 
a way that the local color is felt beneath 
both, so that the observer feels that the 
color itself is constant, whether illuminated 
or shaded, is no small achievement. 

People generally do not notice shadows 
at all. Shadows, under normal conditions, 
are never obtrusive; they do not attract at- 
tention to themselves, nor interfere with 
the enjoyment of the subject as a whole. 
They keep their rightful place and quietly 



54 



THOMAS SULLY 

enrich the effect. This picture illustrates 
perfectly the natural play of shadows. How 
clear, well defined, and luminous these 
shadows are, enhanced by contrast with the 
dark lining of the hat. Only an artist of the 
keenest sensitiveness to light and shade lies 
in wait for distinguished shadows, and cap- 
tures them to enrich his pictures. 

The torn hat gave, accidentally, under 
strong sunlight, a shadow across this boy's 
face, which caught the artist's eye. Looking 
' at such a picture as this, one is sure that 
Sully was thrilled with the beauty of the 
moment, and transcribed it with ease and 
with great joy. The picture has the spon- 
taneous quality of a sketch, combined with 
the perfection of a masterpiece. 

How unself conscious the boy is! And 
what a handsome little gentleman! Old 



55 



THE TORN HAT 



clothes and tatters cannot hide his real self. 
As a boy he must have been a success and 
worthy of being thus immortalized by one 
of our early American Masters. 



PLATE X. WHISTLING BOY 

FB.A3STK. IDtJVElSrECBL 

American School 1848-1919 

The "^Whistling Boy" was presented to the 
Cincinnati A.rt Jvtu.seu.rrL by trie painter, 
^w^tio long taught in the Art Academy of 
that: city. 

Trie sixe of the Picture is 28 x 21 inches. 




Whistling Boy Duveneck 




WHISTLING BOY 

<B DUVENECK 



NE can hardly look at this happy- 
go-lucky city urchin without 
thinking of his country cousin 
who Inspired Whittier to say 



"Blessings on thee, little man 
Barefoot boy with cheek of tan! 
With thy turned-up pantaloons, 
And thy merry whistled tunes." 

This boy is not barefoot, perhaps, but no 
doubt his "slip-shod foot goes well" He Is 
not thinking about his feet, nor his tattered 
shirt, nor his torn apron, nor his broken 
basket, nor his uncombed hair, nor his soiled 
face. He Is just whistling, and thinking of 



WHISTLING BOY 

nothing in particular; or, it may be, of 
something very important important to 
him. His eyes are focussed on nothing. He 
whistles just naturally, as he does his task, at 
the moment at peace with the world, en- 
tirely unselfconscious. 

This picture was painted while Duveneck 
was a student In Munich. Its freedom of 
treatment was a daring innovation in 1872, 
and indicated a spirit with individuality and 
independence. The expressive hands are 
sketched with broad suggestive strokes. The 
effect is of things seen out of focus, the 
attention being concentrated on the face, on 
the whistle because he is whistling so well 
without effort. He has handsome eyes, and 
a shock of black hair that suggests a dis- 
tinguished looking young manhood later. 



DUVENECK 

Under his grime and disarray he carries pos- 
sibilities. 

The color scheme is a long and rich anal- 
ogous harmony from red through orange 
and yellow to blue-green. There are no blues 
or purples. A dull green-yellow is the domi- 
nant hue. 

This is what people think of as an artist's 
picture 5 a picture for artists. They admire 
a picture like this not for its subject. Its 
story or its significance; but for Its tech- 
nique, the way it is done. It is so unpre- 
tentious In composition, so temperate in 
color, so masterly In handling, so extremely 
clever without any effort at cleverness, and 
so effective. It Is just "a mighty good bit 
of painting/ 5 

The boy, whoever he was, has been im- 
mortalized by the artist; and lovers of fine 



61 



WHISTLING BOY 

art yet unborn may quote Whittier in the 

presence of this picture: 

"Thou hast more than wealth can buy 
In the reach o ear and eye, 
Outward sunshine, inward joy: 
Blessings on thee, barefoot boy!" 



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